Learning disability and mental retardation

Contents

  1. Psychiatry, medicine, and mind–body dualism
  2. Epidemiology of psychiatric disorder in medical
  3. Medical diagnosis
  4. Psychiatric diagnosis
  5. Medicine, psychiatry, and dualism
  6. Limitations of dualism
  7. Practical consequences of dualism
  8. An integrated approach
  9. Table  15.1 Traditional ‘dualistic’ categories of mental and physical  illness
  10. Table  15.2 The  biopsychosocial formulation
  11. General practice
  12. Casualty departments
  13. Table  15.3 The  relative prevalence of common psychiatric disorders
  14. Medical and surgical wards
  15. The presentation of psychiatric disorder in medical settings
  16. Psychiatric disorder presenting with somatic symptoms
  17. Psychiatric disorder presenting as apparent worsening of a medical  condition
  18. Comorbidity: the co-occurrence of psychiatric and medical conditions
  19. Epidemiology
  20. The importance of psychiatric comorbidity in the medically  ill
  21. Table  15.4 Psychiatric disorders that are common in the medically   ill
  22. The medical condition and its treatment Biological mechanisms
  23. Psychological and social mechanisms
  24. Table  15.5 Medical conditions that may cause psychiatric disorder  directly
  25. Prevention of psychiatric disorder in the medically  ill
  26. Table  15.6 Some drugs with psychological  side-effects
  27. Management of psychiatric disorder in the medically ill
  28. Assessment
  29. General considerations
  30. Medication
  31. Psychological treatments
  32. Somatic symptoms that are unexplained by somatic  pathology
  33. Terminology
  34. Epidemiology
  35. Aetiology
  36. Table  15.7 Physiological sources of bodily  sensations
  37. The  classification of medically unexplained  symptoms
  38. Table  15.8 Experiences which may affect the interpretation of bodily    sensations
  39. Treatment of medically unexplained  symptoms
  40. Management of medically unexplained symptoms Assessment
  41. Management
  42. Chronic fatigue syndrome
  43. Clinical features
  44. Epidemiology
  45. Table  15.9 Case definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (Fukuda et al.,    1994)
  46. Course and prognosis
  47. Treatment
  48. Management
  49. Irritable bowel syndrome
  50. Epidemiology
  51. Aetiology
  52. Treatment
  53. Fibromyalgia
  54. Factitious disorder
  55. Epidemiology
  56. Aetiology
  57. Prognosis
  58. Management
  59. Munchausen’s syndrome
  60. Factitious disorder by proxy
  61. Malingering
  62. Assessment
  63. Management
  64. Somatoform and dissociative disorders
  65. Classification
  66. Somatoform disorder
  67. Table  15.10 Categories of somatoform disorders in disorders in ICD-10 and  DSM-IV
  68. Classification in DSM-IV and ICD-10
  69. Conversion disorder
  70. Clinical features
  71. Epidemiology
  72. Aetiology
  73. Prognosis
  74. Treatment
  75. ‘Epidemic hysteria’
  76. Somatization disorder
  77. Epidemiology
  78. Aetiology
  79. Treatment
  80. Undifferentiated somatoform disorder
  81. Hypochondriasis
  82. Epidemiology
  83. Prognosis
  84. Aetiology
  85. Treatment
  86. Body dysmorphic disorder
  87. Assessment
  88. Treatment
  89. Somatoform disorder not otherwise  specified
  90. Somatoform pain disorder
  91. Some  specific pain syndromes
  92. Headache
  93. Facial pain
  94. Back pain
  95. Chronic pelvic pain
  96. Dissociative disorders
  97. Types  of dissociative disorder
  98. Table  15.11 DSM-IV classification of dissociative disorder and their ICD-10  equivalents
  99. Dissociative fugue
  100. Dissociative  identity disorder
  101. Depersonalization disorder
  102. Clinical picture
  103. Differential diagnosis
  104. Aetiology
  105. Prognosis
  106. Treatment
  107. Other dissociative syndromes in ICD-10 (not specifically listed in DSM-IV) Dissociative stu
  108. Ganser’s syndrome
  109. Trance  and possession disorder
  110. Cultural syndromes
  111. Recovered memories and false-memory syndrome
  112. Factitious dissociative identity  disorder
  113. Psychiatric services in medical settings
  114. The  make-up of services
  115. Psychiatric consultation in a medical  setting
  116. First steps
  117. The  assessment interview
  118. Clinical notes
  119. Writing the response  to the referral
  120. Management
  121. Continuing care
  122. Some common emergency problems General approach
  123. The  anxious patient
  124. The  angry patient
  125. The  aggressive or violent patient
  126. Emergency drug treatment for disturbed or violent  patients
  127. Problems in consent to treatment
  128. Psychiatric aspects of medical procedures and conditions
  129. Genetic counselling
  130. Psychiatric aspects of surgical treatment Pre-operative problems
  131. Psychiatric problems in the post-operative  period
  132. Plastic surgery
  133. Limb amputation
  134. Organ transplantation
  135. Diabetes
  136. Psychological factors and diabetic control
  137. Problems of being diabetic
  138. Other problems
  139. Organic psychiatric syndromes in diabetic  patients
  140. Psychiatric aspects of management
  141. Other endocrine disorders
  142. Other metabolic and autoimmune disorders
  143. Cardiac disorders
  144. Angina
  145. Myocardial infarction
  146. Non-cardiac chest pain
  147. Sensory disorders Deafness
  148. Tinnitus
  149. Blindness
  150. Infections
  151. HIV infection
  152. Cancer
  153. Treatment for psychological consequences
  154. Childhood cancer
  155. Accidents
  156. Associations with particular kinds of  accident
  157. ‘Compensation neurosis’
  158. Psychiatric aspects of obstetrics and gynaecology
  159. Pregnancy
  160. Hyperemesis gravidarum
  161. Pseudocyesis
  162. Couvade syndrome
  163. Termination of unwanted pregnancy
  164. In-vitro fertilization (IVF)
  165. Spontaneous abortion
  166. Antenatal death
  167. Caesarean section
  168. Postpartum mental disorders
  169. Minor mood disturbance (‘maternity blues’)
  170. Postpartum psychosis
  171. Epidemiology
  172. Aetiology
  173. Clinical features
  174. Management
  175. Prognosis
  176. Postnatal depression of mild or moderate  severity
  177. Aetiology
  178. Management
  179. Effects on the child
  180. Psychiatric aspects of gynaecology Premenstrual syndrome
  181. The menopause
  182. Hysterectomy
  183. Sterilization

 

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