Dementia, delirium, and other neuropsychological disorders

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Classification
  3. Table  13.1 Classification of organic mental disorders
  4. Frontal lobe
  5. Parietal lobe
  6. Temporal lobe
  7. Occipital lobe
  8. Corpus callosum
  9. Subcortical structures and cortico-subcortical circuits
  10. Thalamus, basal ganglia, and  cerebellum
  11. Rostral brainstem
  12. White matter
  13. Memory systems and their neuroanatomy
  14. Assessment of the ‘neuropsychiatric patient’
  15. History and mental state examination
  16. Physical examination
  17. Investigations
  18. Delirium
  19. Epidemiology
  20. Clinical features
  21. Aetiology
  22. Table  13.2 Clinical features of delirium
  23. Management of delirium General principles
  24. Table  13.3 Causes of delirium
  25. Table  13.4 Investigations for delirium
  26. Outcome
  27. Amnesia and amnestic syndromes
  28. Table  13.5 Causes of amnesia
  29. Aetiology and pathology
  30. Korsakov syndrome
  31. Investigation and management
  32. Table  13.6 Differential diagnosis of transient amnesia and other paroxysmal neuropsychiatr
  33. Course and prognosis
  34. Transient global amnesia
  35. Dementia
  36. Clinical features of dementia
  37. Table  13.7 Causes of dementia
  38. Subcortical and cortical dementia
  39. Table  13.8 Clinical features that help to distinguish between major causes of   dementia
  40. Table  13.9 Features of cortical and subcortical dementias
  41. Table  13.10 Examples of cortical, subcortical, and mixed causes of  dementia
  42. Assessment of the cause of  dementia
  43. Table  13.11 Screening tests for dementia
  44. Assessment of risk  in dementia
  45. Early detection of dementia
  46. Alzheimer’s disease
  47. Clinical features
  48. Table  13.13 Key clinical features of Alzheimer’s  disease
  49. Investigations
  50. Neuropathology
  51. Aetiology and pathogenesis
  52. Table  13.14 Risk  factors for Alzheimer’s disease
  53. Vascular dementia
  54. Clinical features
  55. Aetiology
  56. Dementia with Lewy bodies
  57. Clinical features
  58. Neuropathology
  59. Table  13.15 Abbreviated clinical criteria for dementia with Lewy bodies
  60. Frontotemporal dementias
  61. Clinical features and subtypes
  62. Table  13.16 Some  clinical criteria for frontotemporal dementias
  63. Table  13.17 Diagnostic categories subsumed within frontotemporal  dementia
  64. Neuropathology
  65. Aetiology
  66. Prion diseases
  67. Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease
  68. Other prion diseases
  69. Aetiology
  70. Dementia due to HIV disease
  71. Dementia due to alcohol misuse
  72. Emerging concepts of dementia
  73. Mixed dementia
  74. Molecular classification of neurodegenerative  diseases
  75. Prevention of dementia
  76. Movement disorders
  77. Parkinson’s disease Clinical features
  78. Table  13.18 Neuropsychiatric manifestations in Parkinson’s  disease
  79. Aetiology
  80. Huntington’s disease
  81. Neuropathology
  82. Aetiology
  83. Table  13.19 Features of Huntington’s disease
  84. Dystonias
  85. Occupational dystonia
  86. Tics
  87. Gilles de  la Tourette syndrome
  88. Epilepsy
  89. Table  13.20 Classification of  seizures
  90. Simple partial seizures
  91. Complex partial seizures
  92. Table  13.21 Clinical features of complex partial  seizures
  93. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures
  94. Myoclonic, atonic, and other seizure  types
  95. Epidemiology
  96. Aetiology
  97. Making the diagnosis
  98. Psychiatric aspects of epilepsy
  99. Pre-ictal disturbances
  100. Ictal disturbances
  101. Table  13.22 Associations between epilepsy and psychological  disturbance
  102. Post-ictal disturbances
  103. Inter-ictal disturbances
  104. Table  13.23 Risk  factors for depression in  epilepsy
  105. Social aspects of epilepsy
  106. Treatment of epilepsy
  107. Head injury
  108. Acute psychological effects
  109. Chronic psychological effects
  110. Post-concussional syndrome
  111. Lasting cognitive  impairment
  112. Personality change
  113. Depression and emotional disorder
  114. Psychosis
  115. Boxing and head injury
  116. Treatment of head injury
  117. Cerebrovascular disorders
  118. Stroke
  119. Personality change
  120. Mood disorder
  121. Subarachnoid haemorrhage
  122. Cerebral vasculitis
  123. Subdural haematoma
  124. Intracranial infections
  125. Neurosyphilis
  126. Encephalitis
  127. Brain tumours
  128. Cognitive  impairments in cancer
  129. Table  13.24 Some causes of cognitive impairment in patients with    cancer
  130. Normal pressure hydrocephalus
  131. Anoxia, hypoglycaemia, and carbon monoxide  poisoning
  132. Systemic lupus erythematosus
  133. Secondary or symptomatic neuropsychiatric syndromes
  134. Table  13.25 Some causes of symptomatic or secondary psychiatric   syndromes

 

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