Clinical Psychology Methods

Contents

  1. Introduction Terminology
  2. The  development of ideas about learning  disability
  3. Epidemiology of learning disability
  4. Clinical features of learning disability
  5. Table  23.1 Features of mild, moderate, and severe/profound learning  disability
  6. Moderate  learning disability (IQ 35–49)
  7. Severe learning disability (IQ 20–34)
  8. Profound learning disability (IQ below 20)
  9. Physical disorders among people with learning  disability
  10. Psychiatric disorders among people with learning disability
  11. Epidemiology and features of psychiatric disorder in people with learning  disability
  12. Schizophrenia
  13. Mood disorder
  14. Anxiety disorders and related conditions
  15. Eating disorders
  16. Personality disorder
  17. Delirium and dementia
  18. Disorders that are usually first diagnosed in childhood and  adolescence
  19. Autism and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  20. Abnormal movements
  21. Challenging behaviour
  22. Sleep disorders
  23. Table  23.2 Causes of challenging  behaviour
  24. Other clinical aspects of learning disability
  25. Sex, relationships,  and parenthood
  26. Sexual problems
  27. Maltreatment and abuse
  28. Growing old
  29. Effects of learning disability on the  family
  30. Aetiology of learning disability
  31. Down’s syndrome
  32. Table  23.3 The  types of causes of learning  disability
  33. Table  23.4 Notes on some genetic causes of learning  disability
  34. Table  23.5 Some non-genetic causes of learning  disability
  35. Table  23.6 Features of Down’s  syndrome
  36. Assessment and classification of people with learning disability
  37. History taking
  38. Mental state examination
  39. Physical examination
  40. Genetic and laboratory investigations
  41. Developmental assessment
  42. Tests  used in developmental assessment
  43. Functional behavioural assessment
  44. Assessment of social interaction and  adjustment
  45. Assessment of needs
  46. Follow-up assessments
  47. The care of people with learning  disability
  48. A historical perspective
  49. General provisions
  50. Specific services
  51. Preventive services
  52. Help for families
  53. Education, training, and occupation
  54. Residential care
  55. Medical services
  56. Psychiatric services
  57. Treatment of psychiatric disorder and behavioural problems
  58. Medication
  59. Psychological treatment
  60. Behaviour modification
  61. Ethical and legal issues in learning disability
  62. Normalization, autonomy, and the conflict of  interests
  63. Consent to treatment
  64. Consent to research

 

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